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Citrix VDI - Grey Screen at logon
Hi Unfortunately I can't replicate it. 1912 works without any issues for me out the box. Win 10 1909 clean build from .iso and fully patched as of this morning > VMTools 11.0.1 > vGPU 10.1 > VDA 1912 It's a clean build Citrix environment (reinstalled this morning) consolidated onto a single VM (DDC, Storefront, Director, SQL Express). No Citrix Policies have been created and only the default ones are applied. Which version of Workspace App are you using? Regards MG
Hi

Unfortunately I can't replicate it. 1912 works without any issues for me out the box.

Win 10 1909 clean build from .iso and fully patched as of this morning > VMTools 11.0.1 > vGPU 10.1 > VDA 1912

It's a clean build Citrix environment (reinstalled this morning) consolidated onto a single VM (DDC, Storefront, Director, SQL Express). No Citrix Policies have been created and only the default ones are applied.

Which version of Workspace App are you using?

Regards

MG

#16
Posted 03/28/2020 12:31 PM   
Hi @MrGRID I already figured it out, I was applying some ctxhooks via a reg file I gathered a while ago from a master image with VDA 7.15 installed. That being said, the grey screen issue is already resolved. Thanks a lot for the follow up and support. Any thoughts on the high memory consumption by the ctxgfx service?
Hi @MrGRID

I already figured it out, I was applying some ctxhooks via a reg file I gathered a while ago from a master image with VDA 7.15 installed.

That being said, the grey screen issue is already resolved.

Thanks a lot for the follow up and support.

Any thoughts on the high memory consumption by the ctxgfx service?

#17
Posted 04/01/2020 11:29 PM   
Hi Apply your registry settings via GPO, it's easier to review and keep track of what's being applied when you upgrade your VDA or Operating System. Regarding the memory leaks, the only advice I can offer is to make sure you're running the latest software throughout your stack. The 2003 VDA is now available, upgrade to that in combination with vGPU 10.1 and see if that helps. Regards MG
Hi

Apply your registry settings via GPO, it's easier to review and keep track of what's being applied when you upgrade your VDA or Operating System.

Regarding the memory leaks, the only advice I can offer is to make sure you're running the latest software throughout your stack. The 2003 VDA is now available, upgrade to that in combination with vGPU 10.1 and see if that helps.

Regards

MG

#18
Posted 04/02/2020 07:15 AM   
Hi @MrGRID, Quick question... As I mentioned earlier, we are assigning M10-1B vGPU profiles to these Windows 10 VDIs. These users are using Windows-based thin clients with 2 x monitor @1080p. They are office power users that pretty much use enterprise apps, but they rarely run multimedia stuff such as YouTube, video conferences, and video training. On top of that, we use Pi-Hole to block ads and push ad-blockers extensions/add-ons to their browsers. I used the following guide as a reference: http://images.nvidia.com/conten t/pdf/grid/guides/vgpu-profile-sizing-guidance-for-windows-10.pdf Based on your experience, would it make sense to upgrade their vGPU profiles to M10-2B?
Hi @MrGRID,

Quick question...

As I mentioned earlier, we are assigning M10-1B vGPU profiles to these Windows 10 VDIs.

These users are using Windows-based thin clients with 2 x monitor @1080p. They are office power users that pretty much use enterprise apps, but they rarely run multimedia stuff such as YouTube, video conferences, and video training. On top of that, we use Pi-Hole to block ads and push ad-blockers extensions/add-ons to their browsers.

I used the following guide as a reference:

http://images.nvidia.com/conten
t/pdf/grid/guides/vgpu-profile-sizing-guidance-for-windows-10.pdf


Based on your experience, would it make sense to upgrade their vGPU profiles to M10-2B?

#19
Posted 04/17/2020 12:44 AM   
Hi Unfortunately this isn't an answer anyone else can give you, as your environment specifications, applications, user working habits and therefore overall utilisation will vary to anyone else's. You'll need to monitor the utilisation on a subset of your VMs and decide what's appropriate. Here's my favourite utility for this kind of thing: https://github.com/JeremyMain/GPUProfiler/releases It's nice and easy to understand, just capture the metrics for a group of users (the more the better) and take appropriate action based on the results. Other tools are available if you wanted to dive a bit deeper. If you increase the vGPU Profile size, at best, you halve the density of the GPU potentially doubling your overall Server hardware requirement, unless you have some headroom built-in. This is why it's absolutely critical to run well defined POCs before the hardware specifications that will be used are finalised. If unsure, it's far better to over-spec than under-spec the environment. I've seen it happen before in an environment where the customer used the the wrong vGPU Profile and it worked out very, very expensive for them to put right. Regards MG
Hi

Unfortunately this isn't an answer anyone else can give you, as your environment specifications, applications, user working habits and therefore overall utilisation will vary to anyone else's. You'll need to monitor the utilisation on a subset of your VMs and decide what's appropriate. Here's my favourite utility for this kind of thing: https://github.com/JeremyMain/GPUProfiler/releases It's nice and easy to understand, just capture the metrics for a group of users (the more the better) and take appropriate action based on the results. Other tools are available if you wanted to dive a bit deeper.

If you increase the vGPU Profile size, at best, you halve the density of the GPU potentially doubling your overall Server hardware requirement, unless you have some headroom built-in.

This is why it's absolutely critical to run well defined POCs before the hardware specifications that will be used are finalised. If unsure, it's far better to over-spec than under-spec the environment. I've seen it happen before in an environment where the customer used the the wrong vGPU Profile and it worked out very, very expensive for them to put right.

Regards

MG

#20
Posted 04/17/2020 07:43 AM   
Hey @MrGRID, Thank you for your always prompt and wise responses. Actually I have used that tool among others (Remote Display Analyzer and GPUPerf3), great for sizing and troubleshooting. Would you enable Hardware Graphics Acceleration on VDIs with vGPUs on apps such as browsers, PDF and MS Office apps? Thank you
Hey @MrGRID,

Thank you for your always prompt and wise responses.

Actually I have used that tool among others (Remote Display Analyzer and GPUPerf3), great for sizing and troubleshooting.

Would you enable Hardware Graphics Acceleration on VDIs with vGPUs on apps such as browsers, PDF and MS Office apps?


Thank you

#21
Posted 04/17/2020 02:00 PM   
Hi Regardless of the workload, any VM that's running Windows 10 should ideally have a GPU attached for the best experience. The specific type of GPU depends on the workload. There are some Customers who refuse to add GPU acceleration to their deployments due to various reasons (which are nearly all associated with Cost), however it's been proven many times that the best user experience is delivered when a GPU is present in the System. Having access to a GPU also provides more than just graphics, it also offloads the session encoding from the CPU to the dedicated encoders on the GPU, again improving the experience. Everything you've listed supports GPU acceleration. Browsers, MS Office, Adobe Acrobat and obviously Windows 10. Yes, you should be using a GPU on your VMs for the best experience with Hardware Acceleration enabled in all of those Apps. Regards MG
Hi

Regardless of the workload, any VM that's running Windows 10 should ideally have a GPU attached for the best experience. The specific type of GPU depends on the workload. There are some Customers who refuse to add GPU acceleration to their deployments due to various reasons (which are nearly all associated with Cost), however it's been proven many times that the best user experience is delivered when a GPU is present in the System.

Having access to a GPU also provides more than just graphics, it also offloads the session encoding from the CPU to the dedicated encoders on the GPU, again improving the experience.

Everything you've listed supports GPU acceleration. Browsers, MS Office, Adobe Acrobat and obviously Windows 10. Yes, you should be using a GPU on your VMs for the best experience with Hardware Acceleration enabled in all of those Apps.

Regards

MG

#22
Posted 04/17/2020 05:55 PM   
Hi @MrGRID. I couldn't agree more, specially on Windows 10 the user experience is way better when vGPUs are assigned to VDIs. Thank you for your suggestions, I am enabling Hardware Acceleration on all the apps that support it. Regards.
Hi @MrGRID.

I couldn't agree more, specially on Windows 10 the user experience is way better when vGPUs are assigned to VDIs.

Thank you for your suggestions, I am enabling Hardware Acceleration on all the apps that support it.


Regards.

#23
Posted 04/17/2020 08:17 PM   
Hi @MrGRID, The CtxGfx.exe memory leak was resolved with a private fix (TwEncode.dll) provided by Citrix. It works wonder with both, CVDA 1912 and CVDA 1912 CU1. Thank you for all your help and support.
Hi @MrGRID,

The CtxGfx.exe memory leak was resolved with a private fix (TwEncode.dll) provided by Citrix.

It works wonder with both, CVDA 1912 and CVDA 1912 CU1.


Thank you for all your help and support.

#24
Posted 05/27/2020 07:35 PM   
Hi That's great news! Glad you were able to get it resolved! That should make the environment easier to manage and work with. You're welcome, glad what we discussed was useful :-) Regards MG
Hi

That's great news! Glad you were able to get it resolved! That should make the environment easier to manage and work with.

You're welcome, glad what we discussed was useful :-)

Regards

MG

#25
Posted 05/28/2020 07:52 AM   
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