NVIDIA
What makes a circuit bootable or capable of runnning an OS?
Maybe it's a broad range of problems. I posted this for the premise that any programmer (not an HTML coder, who does not, strictly speaking, do programming, though HTML does require a lot of specific knowledge and bears a certain resemblance to programming) should be familiar with this information and be able to answer. However, I got a downvote and a suggestion to post here instead. So I am doing. I'd like to clarify for myself the following area. Let's consider the universum of Integrated Circuits. An FPGA, a DSP, a USB controller chip, a CPU and a[url=http://blog.csdn.net/JiaJunLee/article/details/52067962] GPU[/url] are all examples of IC. However, I realize that a USB controller, or an FPGA can not "run an operating system", whereas a CPU can. Another source of confusion arose when in a lecture, we were told that "Xeon PHI (the older one, pre-Knights Landing) runs an independent operating system and can be booted, thus you need to communicate with it over the network". As far as I understand, this differentiates the Phi from say a GPU which while physically being on the same PCI-E bus is a "slave" [url=http://www.kynix.com/Detail/109685/DEVICE12.html]device12[/url] to the CPU. To make this question exact, let me outline the following points: Does "this IC is bootable" equal "this IC can run an operating system"? What makes an IC capable of the above (e.g. if we compare an ASMedia USB controller and a CPU, both of which are physically pieces of binary-code-executing silicon)? What does it mean exactly that an IC is running an OS, how are the processes on the silicon different for say a USB controller and a CPU? This may be dubbed broad but I've put it as precise as possible. Basically it's a single question, but broken down into pieces for clarity. Thanks
Maybe it's a broad range of problems.
I posted this for the premise that any programmer (not an HTML coder, who does not, strictly speaking, do programming, though HTML does require a lot of specific knowledge and bears a certain resemblance to programming) should be familiar with this information and be able to answer. However, I got a downvote and a suggestion to post here instead. So I am doing.

I'd like to clarify for myself the following area.

Let's consider the universum of Integrated Circuits. An FPGA, a DSP, a USB controller chip, a CPU and a GPU are all examples of IC. However, I realize that a USB controller, or an FPGA can not "run an operating system", whereas a CPU can. Another source of confusion arose when in a lecture, we were told that "Xeon PHI (the older one, pre-Knights Landing) runs an independent operating system and can be booted, thus you need to communicate with it over the network". As far as I understand, this differentiates the Phi from say a GPU which while physically being on the same PCI-E bus is a "slave" device12 to the CPU.

To make this question exact, let me outline the following points:

Does "this IC is bootable" equal "this IC can run an operating system"? What makes an IC capable of the above (e.g. if we compare an ASMedia USB controller and a CPU, both of which are physically pieces of binary-code-executing silicon)?

What does it mean exactly that an IC is running an OS, how are the processes on the silicon different for say a USB controller and a CPU?

This may be dubbed broad but I've put it as precise as possible. Basically it's a single question, but broken down into pieces for clarity.
Thanks

#1
Posted 11/02/2017 04:08 AM   
Scroll To Top

Add Reply