NVIDIA
Revit CPU sizing
I select a server for tasks revits and autocad. I need to ensure the work of 16 users in the revit and in the autocad. At the moment I already have 2 servers with users working on it. I use vSphere 6.0, ESXi 6.0U3, Horizon 7.1. I noticed that the processor frequency has a very important role in the performance of the revit. In particular, in creating and working with models and rendering. Also, when planning virtual machines, it is important to consider the ratio of virtual cores to the physical cores of the host processor. I try to come to a two-to-one ratio. two virtual cores per one physical. The number of virtual cores in Vm will be 6. 16 * 6 cores = 96 cores 96/2 = 48 physical nuclei should be. Since it is recommended to use 3+ GHz processors. That in the line e5-2600v4 the suitable model is E5-2687W V4. 12 cores 3.0 GHz. Since the server 2x socket I need 2 servers with 2 processors. In line skalable processors is Intel® Xeon® Gold 6154 Processor. 18 cores 3.0 GHz. What do you think is the density of the CPUs per physical core is optimal for good performance? In the examples from vmvare I see a much higher density of virtual cores than I think is optimal. I use the k2 grid in my old servers, they show good performance. k260q profile. If you look at Tesla cards, will there be a performance gain? After all, they support newer versions of API and various features. However, I'm not sure that they will be required.
I select a server for tasks revits and autocad.
I need to ensure the work of 16 users in the revit and in the autocad.
At the moment I already have 2 servers with users working on it.
I use vSphere 6.0, ESXi 6.0U3, Horizon 7.1.
I noticed that the processor frequency has a very important role in the performance of the revit. In particular, in creating and working with models and rendering.
Also, when planning virtual machines, it is important to consider the ratio of virtual cores to the physical cores of the host processor.
I try to come to a two-to-one ratio. two virtual cores per one physical.
The number of virtual cores in Vm will be 6.
16 * 6 cores = 96 cores
96/2 = 48 physical nuclei should be.
Since it is recommended to use 3+ GHz processors.
That in the line e5-2600v4 the suitable model is E5-2687W V4. 12 cores 3.0 GHz.
Since the server 2x socket I need 2 servers with 2 processors.
In line skalable processors is Intel® Xeon® Gold 6154 Processor. 18 cores 3.0 GHz.
What do you think is the density of the CPUs per physical core is optimal for good performance?
In the examples from vmvare I see a much higher density of virtual cores than I think is optimal.
I use the k2 grid in my old servers, they show good performance. k260q profile.
If you look at Tesla cards, will there be a performance gain? After all, they support newer versions of API and various features.
However, I'm not sure that they will be required.

#1
Posted 05/13/2018 08:54 PM   
Hi, you need to calculate 1 pCPU per VM and therefore a CPU with 8 Core and 3.2GHz would be even better for your request as you only have to deal with 16 users. Regarding the Tesla boards you will for sure see a performance gain but there are also other features with Maxwall/Pascal like monitoring/motion support... Regards Simon
Hi,

you need to calculate 1 pCPU per VM and therefore a CPU with 8 Core and 3.2GHz would be even better for your request as you only have to deal with 16 users.
Regarding the Tesla boards you will for sure see a performance gain but there are also other features with Maxwall/Pascal like monitoring/motion support...

Regards

Simon

#2
Posted 05/14/2018 02:16 PM   
Calculating: 1 server 2 graphics cards grid k2 2 processors 12 cores 3.0 GHz VM 6 virtual cores profile k260q Number of VM - 8 pieces per server. Physical cores 24 Virtual cores 48 Ratio vcpu to pcpu - two to one If I take your example then the physical cores 8 * 2 = 16 Virtual cores 48 The ratio is three to one. Why do you think that this option with 8 cores processors is better?
Calculating:
1 server
2 graphics cards grid k2
2 processors 12 cores 3.0 GHz
VM
6 virtual cores
profile k260q
Number of VM - 8 pieces per server.
Physical cores 24
Virtual cores 48
Ratio vcpu to pcpu - two to one

If I take your example
then the physical cores 8 * 2 = 16
Virtual cores 48
The ratio is three to one.

Why do you think that this option with 8 cores processors is better?

#3
Posted 05/15/2018 07:12 AM   
Because it is sufficient, the CPU is cheaper and you have a higher single thread clock frequency. In addition I don't see a real advantage of 6vCPUs. 4vCPUs for the given applications should be more than OK. Regarding your ratio: 4:1 is what I do in most of the projects and it just works so you don't need to be afraid. Regards Simon
Because it is sufficient, the CPU is cheaper and you have a higher single thread clock frequency. In addition I don't see a real advantage of 6vCPUs. 4vCPUs for the given applications should be more than OK.
Regarding your ratio: 4:1 is what I do in most of the projects and it just works so you don't need to be afraid.

Regards

Simon

#4
Posted 05/15/2018 03:20 PM   
I also think that 4 virtual cores are enough. In addition, in virtualization, the number of vcpu should be selected so that they are as small as possible, but at the same time enough for normal operation. However, in the system requirements of the autodesk, it is recommended to use 6-8 vcpu and 6 vcpu are used in the configuration examples from VMvare for this task. Most of the operation in Revit is single-threaded, that is, they use only one cpu core. I tried the RFO benchmark tests with VM on 6 cores and on 8 cores. 8 cores showed a small increase in comparison with 6 cores. It will be necessary to try to run the RFO benchmark on a 4-core VM.
I also think that 4 virtual cores are enough. In addition, in virtualization, the number of vcpu should be selected so that they are as small as possible, but at the same time enough for normal operation.
However, in the system requirements of the autodesk, it is recommended to use 6-8 vcpu and 6 vcpu are used in the configuration examples from VMvare for this task.
Most of the operation in Revit is single-threaded, that is, they use only one cpu core.
I tried the RFO benchmark tests with VM on 6 cores and on 8 cores. 8 cores showed a small increase in comparison with 6 cores. It will be necessary to try to run the RFO benchmark on a 4-core VM.

#5
Posted 05/16/2018 06:31 AM   
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